White Mountain School of Magic

About a year ago a couple of fellow Harry Potter fans who respected the detail pickiness of my brain and my writing (poor sods) asked me to create an American school of magic. I gave it some thought and had a few ideas but nothing really came of it. Interest was lost in the subject and it lingered in the back of my mind, pretty much useless. The other day after coming back from watch Chamber of Secrets onscreen, my brain kicked in and out came White Mountain School of Magic. I have also come to the realization that I will never understand the workings of my brain and I should not even bother trying to comprehend it anymore. So for those who want an American magic school to play with, here it is. This is basically just a school manual, with a history, class curriculum, teachers to work with and whatnot. Feel free to play until your heart is content. Free reign allowed by all, just be sure to send me what you've done because I'd love to see it. A few things I should mention were in my mind when I created this school:

1) American wizards and witches live in a Muggle-like world and often live Muggle-like existences. Some have Muggle businesses, marry into Muggle families etc. For the most part there is no distinction between pure bloods and non-pure bloods, though of course, there are those that hold to that destinction. The world of Muggles is not completely alien to them but its not completely familiar either. I also make note here that early in colonial history wizards and witches set up their own colonies so many towns or communities around the USA are magical in nature, similar to Hogsmeade, or have Muggles living in them that aren't bothered by a primarily magical population.

2) American magic users have their own government called the United States Magical Congress and it serves the same function as the Ministry of Magic in Rowling's books but following the pattern of our own government and its structurization.

3) Other than that, anything goes. Its up to you to fill in any blanks or whatever. Make whoever you want evil, good, the grey in-between. I have no backgrounds for the teachers other than what classes they teach; I just slapped a name to the class.

4) Students begin attendance at White Mountain at age 13 or 14 and go until they have completed all five years (around age 18). I realize this seems odd but I wanted to avoid the seven years of Rowling's Hogwarts and still maintain a semblence of American educational systems. So I kinda mixed around the concept of high school, middle school, and college preparatory, keeping in mind that most students attending White Mountain would go on into magical lives and not Muggle lives, no matter their background and origins. (shrug)

For easy reference, you can either continue to scroll down to read or use the links to jump around. Have fun and again let me know what you do and how you interpret things, as its open season and I'd love to know how others view this.


The History of White Mountain School of Magic
The Houses of White Mountain
House and School Shields
Class Curriculum at White Mountain
Course Descriptions by Year
Extracurricular Activities
Familiars and Pets
Uniforms and Robes, Medical Records, and Supplies
White Mountain Staff
Campus Map



The History of White Mountain School of Magic

Lewis and Clark Corps of Discovery may have found their camp at the foot of the Glacier Mountains on the Marias River a disappointment and so named their camp Camp Disappointment, but magical explorers Ananias Jameson and Ivan Sorovosky were not in the least disappointed. Enchanted by the fantastic scenery and obvious magical potency of the area, Jameson and Sorovosky thought it the perfect, out of the way place to educate the young magical minds of the newly created United States of America. Following in the footsteps of the famous Muggle explorers only a scant five years later, Jameson and Sorovosky spent much time ascertaining the exact location to build a school equal to the schools of magic to be found in Europe. Ananias Jameson, a Yorkshire-born Englishman had attended Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry before leaving to make his fortune in the Americas. Like many before him who were born in England and moved to America to seek his fortune, he embraced the ideals of the Colonies and, when war broke out between his motherland and his adopted land, he chose the side of the Americans, fighting with fellow Carolinians in the War for Independence. During this time he met Ivan Sorovosky, a Russian-born immigrant wizard who had attended The Durmstrang Institute, and the two became fast friends. When the reports coming from the Corps of Discovery were brought back to the United States and the two men read them, they contrived to speak with members of the Corps. After ascertaining particularly quiet and uninhabited areas even by native populations, the two men set out to explore on their own, determined to find a place far removed from civilization to create a school to teach American wizards and witches.

Their own journals and notes can be found within the school's library and are a fascinating revelation into the exploration of the American West from a magical point of view. However, it is clear that both Jameson and Sorovosky both agreed that along the Marias River in what is now Glacier National Park would be the ideal location for a magical school. In 1813 the first buildings of the school were built and the spells of shielding and magical maintainence were cast. The school started as several huge log cabins and two log long house dormitories, Virtus and Destiny. The cold climate mixed with short days and long nights made for difficult ways of instruction, yet the school persevered. The population of the school remained quite low, no more than two hundred students even beyond the late 1860s, but following the Civil War, the students began to flood into the school. Muggle-born students were allowed in, as well as minorities such as African-Americans, Latin-Americans, and Native Americans by the 1880s and 1890s. With such an expansion, new facilities were built of stone and steel and new dormitories were added to accomodate not only the increased student body but also the simplistic form of dividing the students as artists or logics was no longer viable. By the 1920s Asian-Americans were also allowed into the school. Also by this time the European curriculum of magic was no longer sufficient as it was obvious that many of the students practiced their own magic based off their own heritage. A broader base of magic was taught, taking into account the varying forms of magic and belief structure, reflecting the "Melting Pot" that typified America in general as well.

More buildings and more protective spells were placed upon the school by the 1950s. The fact that White Mountain now sits in the midst of a popular national park amazingly seems to have no effect on the school's inhabitants or Muggle tourist coming to view the marvelous scenery created by Mother Nature. The facilities are a mix of the modern and the traditional with care toward comfort, safety, and encouragement to learn.

White Mountain School of Magic is now considered world-wide to have the most comprehensive and broad-based curriculum. Many older and more traditional schools from Europe or Asia might consider White Mountain too liberal in its educational tenets, yet the school reflects the basic principles of which the United States itself was founded: equality and the ability to fullfill one's complete potential regardless of race, background or class.

Parents and guardians of potential students are welcome to visit White Mountain to ascertain for themselves the quality of education that White Mountain School of Magic devotes to its students and has done since the first pioneer-spirited students stepped into a large log cabin classroom in 1813. Visitors are also encouraged to visit these well-preserved buildings that now serve as museum and guest facilities on campus.

White Mountain School of Magic welcomes all potential and returning students to America's number one magical school.

Return to Menu


The Houses of White Mountain

The modern school currently has five dormitories, or houses, in which students are placed at the beginning of their educational life at White Mountain. The first two houses were created with the school. The Board of Directors in 1813 generously asked Ananias Jameson and Ivan Sorovosky to name the houses. Jameson, the dreamer of the two, fervently believed in the concept of "Manifest Destiny", or the belief that a nation or even a person could not exist without a sense of destiny or purpose, named his house "Destiny", feeling that those who entered there would be the drive and energy of the magical community within the growing country of America. Sorovosky was less of an idealist and more of a practical nature. He was a man of reason, born in an age of reason and embraced the philosophies of the ancients such as Seneca and Cicero. He believed in natural order and logical thinking. Duty and getting things accomplished were more important than grandiose dreams that could not be realized without action. He named his house "Virtus" after the Roman concept of duty.

As time passed and the student body and curriculum expanded, three more houses sprang into existance. Two were based off physical magic to balance the originating houses start with mental disciplines of imagination and logic. Medicine, shapeshifting, channeling and physical control were emphasized in these two houses. The first, founded in 1837, was influenced heavily by Michael Willowbrook, a former merchant who had traveled much of the world not only for business but also to study other disciplines of magic. He was deeply interested in the Asian magic arts and had been deeply affected by the idealism of Toaism and Chi. When Willowbrook became principle of White Mountain in 1837, he formed a new house that he called Chi and the curriculum expanded into the Oriental magical arts. Those in House Chi tended to internalize magic, focusing on personal ability rather than group ability. Later in the 1850s, he brought a second house to the school by utilizing the other end of the Chi form, the external. With the influence of witch Marie Laveau of New Orleans, who was famous for her powers within the realm of voodoo, a different physical type of magic was introduced. Channeling and the influence of the environment around the magic user was central to the new house and House Loa, named for the Voudon pantheon in Laveau's honor, came into being.

No new changes to the house dormitories would come until the late 1920s when Principle Alicia Montgomery decided that a balance between the physical and the mental should be utilized. Also the lack of the teachings of nature magic disturbed her greatly and she introduced the aspects of shamanism into the curriculum. With this, came more Native American, Asian and immigrant students from Celtic and Russia backgrounds. A new house was born in 1929, House Ekstatsis, the Greek word for ecstasy, which is one of the bases of shamanistic magic.

Thus the house dormitories at White Mountain stand thus:

House Virtus - house symbol is a scroll in laurel wreath
House Destiny - house symbol is a single star resting on a bank of clouds
House Chi - house symbol is the Chinese characters for the five elements
House Loa - house symbol is representations of the four elements
House Ekstatsis - house symbol is two feathers crossed
White Mountain School of Magic coat of arms - shield with stripes of red, white and blue with a scroll and quill. The words running around the top of the shield's borders are Scientia Libertas Est (Knowledge is Freedom)

As many previous students know, White Mountain places its student within their house dormitories by way of The Throne. The Throne, carved from ancient black granite found deep within the bedrock of the nearby Glacier Mountains, has been enchanted to reveal a student's house dormitory when the student sits upon its seat. Above the student a magical engraving appears briefly dictating which dormitory the student will be assigned. For almost two centuries now The Throne has been infallible and White Mountain continually thanks its fellow magic school, Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry, for aiding in the creation of this fantastic enchanted monument. As always it holds a place of special importance in the main dining hall of Terget Hall where students gather daily and for all occasions of the year.

Return to Menu


White Mountain Crest


House Virtus Crest

House Destiny Crest
House Destiny Crest

House Chi Crest
House Chi Crest

House Loa Crest
House Loa Crest

House Ekstatsis Crest
House Ekstatsis Crest

 

Return to Menu


Class Curriculum at White Mountain

Year One
Charms I
Potions I
Dark Arts Study I
Arithmancy I
Astrology and Astronomy I
Transfigurations I
History of Magic I
Magical Creatures I
Herbology I

Year Two
Charms II
Potions II
Dark Arts Study II
Arithmancy II
Astrology and Astronomy II
Transfigurations II
History of Magic II
Magical Creatures II
Herbology II

Year Three
Charms III
Potions III
Dark Arts Study III
Divinations I
Muggle Studies I
Transfigurations III
History of Magic III
Magical Creatures III
Herbology III

Year Four
Charms IV
Potions IV
Dark Arts Study IV
Divinations II
Muggle Studies II
Transfigurations IV
History of Magic IV
Magical Creatures IV
Herbology IV

Year Five
Charms V
Potions V
Transfiguration V
Herbology V
Magical Creatures V
plus up to four (4) specializations in the following subjects:
Charms
Potions
Transfiguration
Herbology
Magical Creatures
History of Magic
Dark Arts Studies
Divinations
Astrology and Astronomy
Arithmancy

Return to Menu


Course Descriptions by Year

Year One

Arithmancy I
elementary introduction of mathematics, geometry and formulas in everyday magic

Astrology and Astronomy I
study of history of stars and development of astrology - includes weekly night lab session

Charms I
elementary charms

Dark Arts Study I
introduces the Dark Arts mainly through a history of the arts with emphasis on the infamous people, legends and tall tales

Herbology I
cultivation and use of common everyday herbs and plants in the magical world used for cooking, incense and brews

History of Magic I
begins with the Mediterranean societies such as Sumer, Egypt, and Greece as well as early Nordic and Celtic peoples

Magical Creatures I
introduces familiars, spirit guides and other personalized bonds with creatures as well as common magical creatures encountered in the magical everyday world

Potions I
elementary potions making consisting of mild poisons and antidotes, serums and common household potions

Transfiguration I
basic principles of transfiguring objects, starting small and simple

Return to Menu


Year Two

Arithmancy II
advanced study of mathematics and science in dealing with magic - advanced formulas studied

Astrology and Astronomy II
advanced study of stars and how they affect magic through ley lines, moon shifts and destinal charts - includes weekly night lab session

Charms II
charms regarding the mind and physical person are explored, such as levitation, memory modification and summoning

Dark Arts Study II
defense against the dark arts in blocking, disarming, means of escaping Muggle fanatics without injury-end of the semester deals primarily with dueling pairs

Herbology II
study continues with medicinal plants and household plants

History of Magic II
a study of magic in the Americas starting with pre-Columbian societies in North, Central and South Americas, the development of voodoo and progress of magic in modern times

Magical Creatures II
emphasis on creatures in wild such as unicorns, kappas, were-creatures, etc.

Potions II
advanced teaching of poisons and antidotes, creating medicinal potions of minor nature (healing cuts, abrasions, bruises and acne)

Transfiguration II
emphasis on transfiguring large objects such as size reduction or increasement, mass reduction or increasement, minor modifications to large objects such as buildings, automobiles or natural rock formations

Return to Menu


Year Three

Charms III
Study on minor glamours begin - changing physical features or affecting mental or emotional moods

Dark Arts Study III
advanced dueling and defense techniques at first half of year - second half discusses curses, hexes and their negative and positive conotations, cursed objects explored

Divinations I
tea leaves, palm reading and star sign explored as well as numerology

Herbology III
study of geographiccal flora and fauna begins and students are required to successfully maintain a magical plant for the duration of the school year

History of Magic III
Asian magic history explored, including China, Korea, Vietnam, Thailand, Japan, Cambodia, Tibet, Russia and India as well as some Middle Easter cultures (post-Mohammed)

Magical Creatures III
how to care for wounded magical creatures as well as exploration of extinct creatures

Muggle Studies I
everyday objects and their use from colonial to modern times explored and explained - fashion, language, and music emphasized

Potions III
study of antidotes for curses, as well as medicines and serums from Native American, African and Asian origins specifically

Transfiguration III
living matter to inanimate objects transformed

Return to Menu


Year Four

Charms IV
charms developed to affect Muggle living as well as advanced glamours such as full physical glamours, invisibility, silencing and incapacitation

Dark Arts Study IV
continuation of cursing and charming objects and performing curses explored - Unforgivable, their history and use explored at length - all but Killing Curse used in class - Cruciatus and Imperius curses used only on volunteers of strong physical persons or volunteer instructors

Divinations II
crystal balls, premonitions and types of Extra-Sensory Perception studied

Herbology IV
water plants and their care and cultivation explored

History of Magic IV
magical history of Africa, Australia, New Zealand and the oceanic islands worldwide as well as the influences of European magic on native peoples worldwide through colonialization

Magical Creatures IV
creature of the oceans, lakes, rivers, etc. explored and studied

Muggle Studies II
rural and city life comparisoned in America, study of modern technology such as computers, automobiles, telephones and other Muggle gadgets - students at end of semester must successfully type on a computer, drive an automobile and know proper everyday etiquette in Muggle business and public environments

Potions IV
potions regarding transformations, shrinking and growing, curing fatal ailments (such as cancers or tumors), controlling or curing mental ailments (such as depression, ennui, and other mental instabilities) and physical ailments (such as skin conditions, bone or muscle problems) studied

Transfiguration IV
organic objects of all sizes and types are transformed into other organic objects

Return to Menu


Year Five

Charms V
full scale glamours explored, such as large illusions, complex protection spells and magical maintainence of objects like homes, schools, tombs, treasuries etc

Herbology V
students are required to grow and maintain an individual full garden plot of plants throughout the school year - proper environment magically provided

Magical Creatures V
students are required to care and maintain a chosen and approved magical creature throughout the school year - proper environments magically provided

Potions V
advanced potion-making such as Wolfsbane, Veritaserum, immortality and glory potions explored

Transfiguration V
creating objects from transfiguration taught - tree homes, creating underground tunnels, or creating objects from base element molecules

Students in fifth year are required at least one and no more than four specialization(s) in one of the following disciplines:

Arithmancy
advanced formula study from ancient texts

Astrology and Astronomybr> -minor or major emphasis in astrology goes hand in hand with Divining and Portends in Divinations specializationbr> -scientific observations of the cosmos using Muggle and Magical science techniques and advancements

Charms
-Glamours
-Bewitchments

Dark Arts Study
All students who specialize in Defense Against the Dark Arts must pass United States Magical Congress' exam for Auror or Ranger Corps with the intent to enter one of the defense academies in Europe, Asia or the Americas.

Divinations
-Extra Sensory Perception
-Portends and Premonitions
-Divining through Earth Magics

Herbology
-medicinal plants
-conservation of magical plants
-large scale farm techniques of magical plants

History of Magic
-specific cultural study of ancient or modern societies
-language studies
-study of Muggle "magic"
-specific magic study throughout history (such as potions or divination)

Magical Creatures
-veterinary practices
-magical creature conservation and environmental reintroduction

Potions
-medicinal serums and potions
-poisons and their antidotes
-alchemy

Transfiguration
animagus training only - student must decide and study the animal they wish to transform into first quarter - rest of year is devoted to the learning of the animagi transformation process - ALL ANIMAGI STUDENTS MUST REGISTER WITH THE UNITED STATES MAGICAL CONGRESS, THE EUROPEAN MINISTRY OF MAGIC AND THE ASIATIC MAGICAL BUREAU.

Return to Menu


Extracurricular Activities

Quodpot and Quidditch
Each dormitory maintains a Quodpot team and games are held throughout the school year within a large enclosed stadium on campus. With the rise in popularity of Quidditch, the Quodpot field is also used for informal Quidditch games. No organized Quidditch teams exist on campus at this time. Wizard chess tournaments are held twice a year. Plays and concerts are held throughout the year as well, especially during the winter months when it is difficult to go outside due to harsh weather conditions.

The following clubs and organizations are present on campus. Each group has their own membership drives and dues. Students interested in participating in any extracurricular activities must maintain a B average grade or they will be dropped from non-academic activities until improvement is made.

Wizard Chess Club

Quidditch Players of America

Quodpot League of America

White Mountain Choir and Orchestra

International Magical Studies Association

Student Government

White Mountain Dusters (dueling club)

White Mountain Actors Guild
WMAC hold auditions the third week of the schoolyear and prepare for the coming yearly programs. Members participate in set construction and stage productions of plays and musicals throughout the year.

White Mountain Choir and Orchestra
WMCO hold auditions the second week of the year and hold weekly practices for two yearly concerts and one concert fo the United States Magical Congress in mid-May. They also work with WMAC if musical productions are scheduled for the year.

Leisure Ware
A comedy and improvisation group that performs around the campus and sometimes for national functions. In existance since 1988, the group is still going strong and always on the look out for new, energetic and amusing members. Open auditions are held in the third week of the year. Material cheerfully ripped off from anyone if we like it and victims are always sought.

Tone Potion
On campus music group consisting of five members. Arnold Exelby, Karen Idol, June Ruka, Phoenix Kessler, and Cali Begay are in their final academic year and they are looking forward to sharing their talent with the students one last time. Music is varied from jazz to punk rock to country and include many popular songs from Muggle and Magical personalities.

Return to Menu


Familiars and Pets

Students with pets or familiars other than owls or other messenger birds are restricted to the following:

cats
dogs not over 30 lbs. (13kg)
rats
mice
ferrets
snakes (no constrictors or venomous varieties)
amphibians (no venomous varieties)
gerbils
hamsters
guineau pigs
rabbits
fish (no pirana or similar fish please)

Song and tropical birds are no longer allowed due to problems arising with cold weather environment and noise factor. Students are allowed no more than one pet (excluding fish) and must properly maintain the pet's environment and accessories (such as amphibians and snakes within enclosed areas and litter boxes properly cared for). Any slouching in animal care will result in the animal's return to the student's parent or guardian and will not be allowed back for the rest of the year. Any animal that consumes or harms another student's pet will also be forbidden from the school for the remainder of the student's time at White Mountain, as well as payment for damages or replacement pet provided. Aviary with proper environment will be provided for messenger birds of all sorts. School owls will be provided for those who do not have their own.

Return to Menu


Uniforms and Robes, Medical Records, and Supplies

Uniforms are not required for the student body beyond the required robes with dormitory insignia provided at the beginning of the first school year. All students are expected to dress sensibly, however, for the cold climate of the upper United States. Frigid cold conditions last most of the school year. Suggested clothing on top of other normal includes: thermal wear, one or two dress occasion outfits, boots for cold and rainy weather, scarves, gloves or mittens, earmuffs or caps, heavy winter coats and light jackets. Shirts, jackets and ballcaps with brand logos and insignias are allowed within reason. Anything promoting illegal objects such as drugs or alcohol are banned and will be confiscated immediately if discovered.

Medical records of all students are required by the school before attendance begins. White Mountain asks that any changes to these medical records be immediately reported to the school nurse, especially during holidays, breaks, and summer hiatus. The school shall naturally reciprocate should any incidents occur to the student while at the school so that parents and their family practioner are also kept up-to-date. This is for the student(s) health and White Mountain wishes to assure both students, parents and staff that proper care can be expertly provided should incidents occur.

All books and supplies can be purchased on or off campus. Potions ingredients are the only laboratory items not provided by the school. Quills and pens for exams will be provided as they will have anti-cheating spells cast upon them. Semester grades will be sent to parents or guardians on December 20 and May 25 by owl post. Mid-term grades will be supplied to students only, unless special requests are made by parents or guardians of students. Students are, of course, free to share their mid-term grades with parents if they so choose. The purpose of this method is to give the students an accounting of their academic progress, thus allowing them time to improve before final semester grades are issued.

Return to Menu


White Mountain Staff

Principal - Margot Deatrick
Vice-Principal - Pakelo Haupu
Charms I & II - Rossiter Seger
Charms III & IV - Chien Hong
Charm V & Specialization coursework - Alice Crumbo
Transfiguration I, II & Specialization coursework - Thomas Brown Owl
Transfiguration III-V - Mosley Tanner
Potions I-V & Specialization coursework - Caro Burke
History of Magic I, III, V & Specialization coursework - Calvert Mather
History of Magic II, IV & Specialization coursework - Keane Douglas
Herbology I-III - Susan de Chambray
Herbology IV, V & Specialization coursework - Hosmer Prater
Magical Creatures I-IV - Edmund Braddock
Magical Creatures V & Specialization coursework - Ivory Jakes
Astrology & Astronomy I, II, & Specialization coursework - Mandy Woods
Divinations I, II & Specialization coursework - Powell Jorgensen
Dark Arts Study I-III & Specialization coursework - Shepard Donnelly
Dark Art Study IV, V & Specialization coursework - Westley Smith
Arithmancy I, II & Specialization coursework - Mathias Townley
Muggle Studies I & II - Jacob Navarro

Return to Menu


Campus Map

Campus Map

1. The Old Cabin - One of the original buildings and built as a round house log cabin, The Old Cabin, as it is affectionately called, is now the school museum and conference hall.

2. Long House 1 - Formerly the housing facility for House Virtus, Long House 1 is now the school library and study building for the campus.

3. Long House 2 - Formerly the housing facility for House Destiny, Long House 2 is now the only building on campus where Muggle technology can function without the interference of magic. It houses a computer laboratory and other technological devices needed for Muggle Studies or for recreational technology.

4. Terget Hall - Terget Hall is the dining hall and general school meeting building. School activities such as dances are held here. The Throne resides in a place of honor at the head of this building built in 1954.

5. Jameson Hall - classrooms

6. Sorovosky Hall - classrooms

7. Onyx Hall - classrooms

8. Corps of Discovery Courtyard - enclosed courtyard used for recreation and relaxation

9. Franklin Hall - classrooms

10. Glacier Courtyard - created and named shortly following the creation of Glacier National Park, where the school resides, this courtyard affords an excellent and untethered view of the mountains forming the Continental Divide

11. Green House 1 - Herbology classrooms

12. Green House 2 - Herbology classrooms

13. Field House 1 - Herbology/Magical creatures classrooms

14. Field House 2 - Magical creatures classrooms

15. Salish Resident Hall - house dormitories - named for the local Native American Salish tribe

16. Kootenai Visitors Center - Visitors lodging for magical folk staying to visit campus or local area - named for the local Native American Kootenai tribe

17-19. - temporary structures magically built only when needed - at any given point only one or all three can exist on campus

20. Quodpot Pitch - also serves as Quidditch pitch informally and used as avalanche breaker

Return to Menu